Australian Adventure – Cruising down the River

I mentioned the Sale canal in an earlier post and that it links the Port of Sale, now a small boat harbour, to the Thomson River and beyond to the Gippsland Lakes. The Port, the canal and the Swing Bridge were all part of the solution to the challenge of transporting resources out of and bringing supplies in to the area during the late 1800’s when gold was discovered in the area and fine cheese was being made and exported to Europe

There is a twice daily cruise of around two hours by boat down the canal and the Thomson River to the Old Swing Bridge and back and we had waited for some warmer, less windy weather to join the afternoon cruise. The last day of April, a Tuesday, turned out to be such a day and we reported at the dock at 1.45pm where we met Alan, the Captain and owner of the Rubeena, paid the requisite amount and stepped on board the historical boat.

A guard of honour was waiting for us and the navy band struck up as we boarded ………….. actually I made that bit up but that was what it felt like, despite the boat being quite small.

The Rubeena was built in Sydney and was originally licensed on 4 April 1912 (that’s just 11 days before the Titanic sank) and spent most of her working life on the Gippsland Lakes. She has been carefully restored and takes up to 40 passengers, but on our trip there were just 6 others apart from Gerda and myself so we had plenty of room to move about.

Rubeena at its berth in the Port of Sale
The Rubeena

The electric motor is a bonus as it makes the cruise a quiet, gentle experience, especially when the weather is as perfect as it was, with a mild breeze hardly stirring the smooth surface of the river as we set off.

Setting off down the canal

Alan was an excellent captain and guide, giving a running commentary on the features we passed and the significance of the canal, particularly how it served the Sale area during the pioneer years. The canal was dug by horse and scoop and was completed by 1890

Captain and owner Alan in full flow

We were fascinated by the “canoe” trees – old gum trees with visible indentations where the original inhabitants of the area had harvested timber for canoe-building without destroying the tree. According to Alan, some of these trees were  350 to 400 years old and still standing on the banks of the river.

A typical “Canoe Tree”
The canal/river is lined with majestic old trees

At certain spots he also pointed out the sections of the original river course that were diverted and “straightened” to make it more shipping-friendly

Our turnaround point was reached after just more than an hour of gentle puttering – the Old Swing Bridge, which we were able to study in detail as we passed slowly beneath it, then turned around and retraced our route back.

Swing bridge
The mechanics that make it work

Swing Bridge – one half showing with the other half hidden behind vegetation

The bridge is a remarkable example of 19th century engineering with its intricate mechanics which swing it open 180 degrees to allow taller vessels to pass by on either side. It is the oldest intact, operational bridge of its kind in Australia.

I had mentioned my interest in birding to Alan and he kindly made a point of identifying the birds that we spotted along the river, most of which I had already got to know, but happily there were two new birds to add to my growing Australia list –

  • Nankeen Night-heron – as the name suggests, these birds are mostly nocturnal but Alan knew where they roosted during the day and pointed them out high up in a tree, warily watching us from behind a veil of feathers, much like a mysterious eastern dancer may do
Nankeen Night-heron

  • Azure Kingfisher – I spotted it first some way upriver whereupon it flew past the boat, landing briefly right next to us before flying further – unfortunately too quick for me to photograph it

(The photo is taken from The Complete Guide to Australian Birds by George Adams)

Other birds that we encountered along the way were –

  • Australasian Darter

  • Great Cormorant

  • Eurasian Coot

  • Australian Swamphen

  • Australian White Ibis

  • Dusky Moorhen

  • Pacific Black Duck – see the featured image at the top of the post

Two hours had passed and we were sorry it had ended – a really pleasant way to spend a sunny afternoon

 

 

4 thoughts on “Australian Adventure – Cruising down the River”

  1. Gold and cheese – together they have had an interesting impact on the region. Isn’t that Australian White Ibis akin to our Sacred Ibis?

    1. Gold has certainly played a big role in many parts of the world
      When we first saw the Ibis Gerda and I both said “Sacred Ibis”
      The differences are minimal – the Sacred Ibis has a black neck and black tipped secondary feathers to the wings

  2. You certainly seem to be enjoying yourselves, Donald – I’m quite envious!

    1. Our trip is coming to an end but I still have a few posts to catch up – it’s been a great experience “discovering” a new country and people quite similar to our own. I never thought I would say this but Aussies are so friendly and welcoming!

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