Pigeon Valley, Durban

Pigeon Valley Park is a small forested reserve of about 10 hectares in the middle of Durban’s older suburbs on the Berea Ridge and one of my favourite spots when visiting Durban area.

Pigeon Valley-16
Pigeon Valley is located in the middle of old Durban suburbs

I entered the gate and within a couple of minutes had an Olive Sunbird (Olyfsuikerbekkie / Cyanomitra olivacea) fluttering about in the branches above my head and heard the drawn out, repetitive call of a Tambourine Dove (Witborsduifie / Turtur tympanistria) from deep in the forest.

Pigeon Valley Durban
Pigeon Valley Durban

This reserve is famous amongst birders for the reliability of seeing  Spotted Ground Thrush (Natallyster / Zoothera guttata) during the winter months and I can attest to that, having seen it on two out of three of my previous visits. I was on the lookout for it as soon as I entered, scanning the ground between the trees and just 50 metres from the gate I found it in deep shadow, scratching amongst the brown leaf litter.

Spotted Ground Thrush, Pigeon Valley Durban
Spotted Ground Thrush, Pigeon Valley

I approached quietly and the Thrush obliged, briefly moving into a patch of sunlight as I crouched to get closer to the bird’s level, then got in a few shots when it looked up and directly at me for a second.

Spotted Ground Thrush, Pigeon Valley Durban
Spotted Ground Thrush, Pigeon Valley

Buoyed by this wonderful start I made my way slowly up the main path, where I briefly met two other birders who were on their way out – as it turned out they were the only other visitors that I came across in the two and a half hours I was there, so effectively I had the reserve to myself for that time – apart from those tending to the park.

I had the constant accompaniment of birds calling as I walked, most of which I could ID and many of which I saw during the walk. Those heard only included the ubiquitous Sombre Greenbul (Gewone Willie / Andropadus importunus ), Black-backed Puffback (Sneeubal / Dryoscopus cubla), Tambourine Dove, Bar-throated Apalis (Bandkeelkleinjantjie / Apalis thoracica), African Fish-Eagle (Visarend / Haliaeetus vocifer)- probably from a nearby dam – and Black Sparrowhawk (Swartsperwer / Accipiter melanoleucus ), which are known to breed in the reserve.

I spent some time at a tiny pool near the top of the main path, fed by a little stream trickling down from a source outside the reserve. As I sat quietly to one side, there was a constant movement of small birds coming and going, sipping the clear water, some bathing as well – lots of Cape White-eyes (Kaapse glasogie / Zosterops capensis), a pair of Cape Batises (Kaapse bosbontrokkie / Batis capensis), Red-capped Robin-Chat (Nataljanfrederik / Cossypha natalensis), Tawny-flanked Prinia (Bruinsylangstertjie / Prinia subflava)and an unexpected but very welcome surprise in the form of a Grey Waxbill (Gryssysie / Estrilda perreini).

Red-capped Robin-Chat, Pigeon Valley Durban
Red-capped Robin-Chat
Tawny-flanked Prinia, Pigeon Valley Durban
Tawny-flanked Prinia
Grey Waxbill, Pigeon Valley Durban
Grey Waxbill

All of this activity was observed by an African Dusky Flycatcher (Donkervlieëvanger / Muscicapa adusta) hawking insects from a nearby branch, then popping down to the water for a drink.

Dusky Flycatcher, Pigeon Valley Durban
Dusky Flycatcher

Spectacled Weavers (Brilwewer / Ploceus ocularis), which I had heard earlier, also came to the stream for a bathe.

Spectacled Weaver, Pigeon Valley Durban
Spectacled Weaver
Spectacled Weaver, Pigeon Valley Durban
Spectacled Weaver

The bird I was hoping for, Green Twinspot, did not appear so I continued my walk along the perimeter of the reserve, then back to the entrance gate with regular sightings to keep it interesting –

  • Terrestial Brownbul (Boskrapper / Phyllastrephus terrestris) skulking in the lower stratum of the dense bushes, as they like to do
  • Southern Black Flycatchers (Swart vlieëvanger / Melaenornis pammelaina) and Fork-tailed Drongos (Mikstertbyvanger / Dicurus adsimilis) trying their best to confuse my ID abilities by appearing in the same trees, but a check of the tail tip and eye colour was enough to sort them out
Fork-tailed Drongo, Pigeon Valley Durban
Fork-tailed Drongo
  • Surprisingly, for me anyway, numbers of Thick-billed Weavers (Dikbekwewer / Ambliospiza albifrons) in the lower and upper stratum – I am used to finding them near water in reeds, but later reference to the Roberts app showed that they inhabit forests in the non-breeding season, a new discovery for me
  • Grey Sunbird (Gryssuikerbekkie / Cyanomitra veroxii) showing briefly
  • Several White-eared Barbets (Witoorhoutkapper /  Stactolaema leucotis) high up in the trees
White-eared Barbet, Pigeon Valley Durban
White-eared Barbet
  • Golden-tailed Woodpecker (Goudstertspeg / Campethera abingoni)
Golden-tailed Woodpecker, Pigeon Valley Durban
Golden-tailed Woodpecker

And, just before leaving, a bevy of Bronze Mannikins (Gewone fret / Lonchura cucullata) huddled together on a branch made a charming sight

Bronze Mannikin, Pigeon Valley Durban
Bronze Mannikins – knit one, slip one, knit one

Without fanfare or wild expectations, the morning had turned into something memorable, to be savoured for days after.

Adventurous Birding Atlasing and Travel

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